MD Biosciences Blog

Why the Pig is a Good Preclinical Model for Wound Healing

Posted by MD Biosciences on Mar 31, 2017 1:49:14 PM

There are many options for preclinical wound healing research. All studies are designed to predict how a particular treatment will behave in a human wound. In vitro studies, particularly those that are performed on human skin equivalent systems can provide relevant data - but what it lacks - is the ability to monitor any pain as a result of the wound and healing. Rodent studies provide an inexpensive method for gaining data, however rodents differ from humans in a number of anatomical and physiological ways. A rodent's hair is dense, the epidermis and dermis is thin, and healing is primarily through contraction.

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Topics: Dermal, Wound Healing

The Pathology of the IL-33/T1/ST2 Pathway: Harmin’ Alarmin

Posted by MD Biosciences on Aug 10, 2015 4:30:00 PM

IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family that is expressed constitutively in the nucleus of epithelial and endothelial cells as well as in CNS oligodendrocyte and astrocyte cells (1-2). Its release in response to cell damage and/or death has earned it the classification of “alarmin” – an immunological alarm signal that is released in times of cellular distress (3-4). Upon release, IL-33 binds to the T1/ST2 and IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAP) heterodimer complex to activate the MYD88-dependant signaling pathway (1).

Studies targeting the function of IL-33 and/or signaling through its T1/ST2 receptor have highlighted the dual role this versatile cytokine pathway plays in the induction inflammatory immune reactions. More interestingly, these reactions can be either beneficial or pathological in nature. Here we will discuss the pathological role of IL-33 in disease.

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Topics: Dermal, Inflammation, Research Products, Infection, Acute Kidney Injury (AKI)

Preclinical Pig Models for Therapeutic Studies

Posted by MD Biosciences on Nov 7, 2013 11:08:00 AM

Historically, rodent models have been used for the discovery of various biological mechanisms within disease states as well as preclinical development of therapeutics. Unfortunately there are many ways that the biology of rodents fails to accurately predict the clinical conditions of humans - this is particularly the case in pain therapeutics. This can be evidenced by the estimates that as many as 80% of all drug candidates across therapeutic areas fail in the most expensive stages of development - clinical trials. While the failures can be attributed to various reasons such as insufficient efficacy, unacceptable safety profiles or PK properties. With the high cost of developing new therapeutics, there is certainly the need to validate biological and pharmacological findings in models using larger species, which can also address some of the known differences between rodents and human. The pig is one species which may provide more translatable data to the human condition, particularly in therapeutic areas such as cardiovascular, skin or wound healing conditions, metabolic and pain.

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Topics: Dermal, Pain, CRO/outsourcing, Cardiovascular, metabolic

IMQ-induced Psoriasis Model | Correlates with Human Psoriasis

Posted by MD Biosciences on Apr 29, 2013 4:28:00 PM

First let's start by talking about what makes a good preclinical model of psoriasis?

A good pre-clinical psoriasis model should obviously re-capitulate the key features of the clinical disease in humans. Therefore, a plausible model will exhibit the following criteria:

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Topics: Dermal, Psoriasis

Choosing DNCB or FITC-induced Contact Hypersensitivity Models

Posted by MD Biosciences on Jun 1, 2011 9:37:00 AM

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Topics: Dermal, Inflammation