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MD Biosciences Blog

Pain Studies In Pig: advantages for nerve blocks, local & systemic therapies

Posted by MD Biosciences on Nov 22, 2019 10:36:22 AM

MD Biosciences lab has an exclusive expertise in pain studies in the pig. Our scientists have developed an acute model and a neuropathic model in pigs. Both models include a variety of assays that allows us to record spontaneous changes in behavior as well as stimuli induced withdrawal response and electrophysiology monitoring. (Why electrophysiology?)

 

Contact us today to learn how pig studies can benefit your research programs and enhance results of your studies. 


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Topics: Dermal, Pain, CRO/outsourcing, Neuro/CNS, neuropathic pain, Wound Healing, translational research, Electrophysiology, Behavioral Research, porcine model, Nerve Injury

MDB Neuropathic Pain Porcine Model Publication Featured in Neurobiology of Pain Journal

Posted by MD Biosciences on Jul 31, 2018 10:00:00 AM

MDB Scientists recently published a paper titled “Human-like cutaneous neuropathologies associated with a porcine model of peripheral neuritis: a translational platform for neuropathic pain”, and has been accepted to appear in the Neurobiology of Pain Journal effective July of 2018.

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Topics: neuropathic pain, Discoveries, translational research

Pain Response in Pigs Mimics Human Pain Behavior

Posted by MD Biosciences on Nov 17, 2015 12:10:56 PM

The pig peripheral neuritis trauma (PNT) model is an important transitional model that bridges the gap between animal research and the clinic. While we discussed how the the pig PNT model shares many morphological and molecular pathology similarities with skin biopsies from human pain conditions in our poster pdf, our chief scientist was the last, principle author in a preceding publication entitled “Peripheral Neuritis Trauma In Pigs: A Neuropathic Pain Model” in the Journal of Pain. In this paper, authors examine this model in terms of how it relates to the human pain response.

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Topics: Pain, Neuro/CNS, Stress, neuropathic pain